Tactical

Did the women of TikTok just make getting drafted seem fun?

A Sept. 25 article from the Mises Institute titled “The US Military Is Laying the Groundwork to Reinstitute the Draft” has had social media platforms buzzing with concern that the government will be forcing conscription, to include — for the first time — women.

And though recruitment and retention numbers may be down, there is no such plan to force American citizens into military service, nor is there a specific plan to draft women.

Still, that didn’t stop one TikTok user, Timothy James, from amassing nearly 55,000 comments on a video promoting the myth that women will be selected to serve.

Playing off this trend, some female TikTok users have shown what an all-woman draft would like, and frankly, such a conscription effort would be worth its weight in meme gold. Taking on the surge of draft conversations, women across TikTok published comical responses about what would happen if a female draft took place.

For those in favor of the move, posters shared videos about how every night in the barracks would resemble a sleepover with snacks, face masks and hair-braiding parties. A slew of how-to videos even cropped up about how to style a military bun. Others noted that weapons violence would cease and all future wars would come in the form of gossip and pettiness.

Other women who were not so keen on the draft posted videos about what would disqualify them. One said they talk too much to serve and would spill American tea to anyone who tortured them. Another said she’d always be late for battle because it takes her too long to get ready.

Some who viewed James’ original video responded with hilarious measures they would take get out of serving, such as claiming everything from debilitating menstrual cramps to saying, “my mom said I can’t sleep over.”

But perhaps the funniest poster likened an all-female brigade to the Spice Girls’ “Spiceworld” sound off scene.

Strength and courage in a wonder bra, indeed.

Observation Post is the Military Times one-stop shop for all things off-duty. Stories may reflect author observations.

Sarah Sicard is a Senior Editor with Military Times. She previously served as the Digitial Editor of Military Times and the Army Times Editor. Other work can be found at National Defense Magazine, Task & Purpose, and Defense News.

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